‘They come, and just never go home’: Why the Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter - Queensland Property Investor
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‘They come, and just never go home’: Why the Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter

It’s the annual winter prestige property pilgrimage from the southern states to the Sunshine Coast that leading local agent Vicki Stewart has come to know so well.

“People from Sydney and Melbourne come up the first year and fall in love with the climate and the area,” says Ms Stewart, the director of Stewart Property. “They return the next year and don’t want to go home again, so start looking at places to buy.

“And by the third year, they come, and just never go home.”

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 1

She did exactly the same thing too, 34 years ago, on a visit from Sydney, and says that migration from daydreamer to new owner causes a dramatic spike this time every year in the market.

Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella agrees. “Many travel for a holiday and fall in love with our world-class beaches, fine dining and luxury retail shopping precincts,” she says.

“The seeds are planted and while our prices are high compared with the rest of Queensland, when compared with Sydney or Melbourne prices they’re an absolute bargain.”

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 2

At the same time Noosa, at the top of the Sunshine Coast market, has been performing exceptionally well and in the 12 months to March 2019 has hit 8.7 per cent growth, making it Queensland’s strongest area, as against Brisbane’s one to 3 per cent, and the Gold Coast’s 2 to 3 per cent. Since 2014, Noosa prices have risen 44 per cent.

There have been some stellar sales too in the past 18 months, including the $15.2 million sale of tennis ace Pat Rafter’s mansion on Noosa’s Sunshine Beach, followed by the Sunshine Coast record-breaking $18 million purchase of a seven-bedroom trophy home nearby. “But as a general rule of thumb, what you’d buy in Sydney for $20 million will cost you just $8 million here,” says Ms Stewart.

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 3

Domestic tourism – of which this coastal region is “the Australian rock star” according to Visit Sunshine Coast chief executive Simon Latchford – always sparks the property market, while its “Hamptons-style cool” continues to drive it on and up.

“The market does leverage off tourism but, often, as soon as people arrive they realise its strengths,” Mr Latchford says. “There are two airports, lots of new infrastructure, a laid-back lifestyle, an extraordinary climate with no cyclones, crocs or box jellyfish, a community atmosphere in a place that hasn’t been allowed to develop too fast, and Brisbane is only an hour and a half away.

“If you want to savour life as it was back in the ’70s, then this place can offer that environment.”

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 4

The prestige market from $5 million to $12 million is particularly strong at the moment, with demand surging and stock so tight that one buyer bought a home at Noosa Heads in the past few weeks for $2.9 million over the phone, sight unseen.

“We now have a lot of buyers making multiple offers and there’s not much stock as people are making generational purchases; they’re planning to keep it long-term and hand it down to family rather than sell it,” says agent Nic Hunter from Tom Offermann Real Estate.

“Noosa has always been the pinnacle of that prestige end of the market, and people just love the relaxed lifestyle and village atmosphere.”

Four homes in the area

Noosa Waters

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 5

For sale by informal tender with a guide of more than $4 million, this five-bedroom home has a spectacular waterfront position, with beautiful mountain views and a peaceful position.

“As with all the best homes on the Sunshine Coast, you have to consider the cost of not buying now,” says agent Adrian Reed of Reed & Co.

Mooloolaba 

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 6

With deepwater access and an upgraded pontoon to allow the owner to keep anything up to a 58-footer safely moored at home, this family house was designed by Frank Macchia to have a true north aspect.

The home has an in-ground pool and a steam-room, while a recently-installed solar system generates over 100kWh of power in summer and is fitted has battery storage.

It’s going to auction on July 14 through Loren Wimhurst of Next Property Group, with a guide of $4.5 million to $5.5 million.

Noosa Springs 

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 7

Floor-to-ceiling windows in almost every room make sure that the stunning views are maximised and that this house is flooded in natural light.

The media room has its own cosy fireplace, there are electric shutters and blinds and an openable roof to control light and temperatures, and underfloor heating on the ground level and in the bathrooms that service the master bedroom.

The home is for sale with a guide of $3.3 million, with Joe Langley of Universal Property Sales.

Alexandra Headland 

Sunshine Coast’s prestige market sees a spike in winter 8

Billed as a 6-star resort-style home, this home has great north-east ocean views and is just a short stroll to the beach, cafes and shops from its large 1,200sqm block.

There’s an internal lift to each floor, a grand entry foyer, a sound-proofed cinema, in-ground pool and pool room, with landscaped gardens.

It’s for sale with a guide of $3.3 million, through agent Craig Porter of Next Property Group.

 

 

Source: www.domain.com.au

Gold Coast

Gold Coast’s $ 4 million penthouse

Gold Coast’s $ 4 million penthouse

THE Gold Coast’s prestige real estate market got off to a flying start in 2020, selling a trophy penthouse for $ 4 million.

Paid-out Brisbane buyers are buying the sprawling four-bedroom residence in the One Palm Beach development, with completion expected later this month.

Harcourts Coastal’s Tolemy Stevens, who handled the sale, said buyers would use the property as a vacation home.

“The buyers looked at Main Beach, Broadbeach and Mermaid Beach, but ended up in Palm Beach,” said Stevens.

“They loved the size of the penthouse, the fact that it took up the entire level and that they were on the eighth floor and still felt connected to the beach.”

The 466 m² penthouse is located on the top floor and offers a 360-degree view of the Gold Coast.

A media room, a butler’s pantry, an all-round deck and state-of-the-art equipment are among the outstanding features.

Mr. Stevens said the properties on the southern end of the coast are very exciting.

“It shows that Palm Beach is definitely in the spotlight and is becoming more popular over the years,” he said.

“Instead of Main Beach, Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach, buyers are welcome to expand their search criteria, which we didn’t see five years ago.”

The Velocity Property Group developed One Palm Beach with 17 apartments, including the penthouse.

National sales manager Caroline Humbert said the penthouse on the beach would be a fantastic vacation home for the buyer due to its location, space, and views.

“We are thrilled that the buyer can call this incredible 466-square-meter penthouse with four bedrooms, including four parking spaces, an escape to the Gold Coast,” she said.

Ms. Humbert said the Velocity Property Group recognized the unique properties of Palm Beach a few years ago, including the emerging lifestyle factors of restaurants and retail.

One Palm Beach was recognized as a finalist at the UDIA Queensland Awards for Excellence in late 2019.

The average apartment price in Palm Beach is $ 457,750, according to realestate.com

 

 

Source: themediatimes.com

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Brisbane

Six-storey proposal for heritage seaside suburb sparks protest

Six-storey proposal for heritage seaside suburb sparks protest

A quiet seaside suburb in Brisbane’s north could see six-storey buildings rubbing shoulders with single-storey heritage-listed buildings under a neighbourhood plan being drafted by Brisbane City Council.

The Sandgate Neighbourhood Plan, which sets requirements for development and zoning in the suburbs of Sandgate, Shorncliffe and Deagon, proposes increasing height limits along the town centre shopping strip on Brighton Road to six storeys.

But the plan has become a point of contention, with about 500 residents forming a group to protest some of the draft changes which they say could damage Sandgate’s heritage facade and character.

Once Brisbane’s seaside retreats, the coastal suburbs are full of heritage-listed buildings in low-lying streets close to the picturesque foreshores, also heritage listed.

Much of Sandgate is zoned low-density residential, or low-medium with a two-storey height limit.

The council’s proposed neighbourhood plan would also allow the six-storey building height limit behind Brighton Road, between the state school and overlooking the heritage-listed Einbunpin Lagoon.

A similar proposal to allow three-storey buildings around Deagon train station was removed by the council after strong feedback from residents.

Sandgate property owner Theresa Dow has been at the forefront of many protests against the six-storey proposal, arguing allowing mixed-use commercial development would destroy Sandgate’s picturesque appeal and heritage aspects.

She also said residents only discovered the potential for six-storey buildings in a document uploaded to the council’s website.

Ms Dow said she and others in the group were working on their own suggestions for the area.

They submitted petitions to the council asking for extended time for community consultation from the prescribed 20 business days that ended in early November, arguing the council had not advertised the proposed changes widely enough.

“We’re going to do the people’s plan and then hand it to the council,” she said.

“We know we’ve got to change but we just think they need to be talking to us, all of us … not just property owners, but all the people that have lived here. [We] choose to live here because of its beauty, and the way it is.”

Ms Dow said she and others had no problem with change, agreeing the area needed new life and focus, but the council should have consulted more widely and listened more closely to resident concerns.

But, she said, some residents supported the proposal, calling for new shops and upgrades to the area’s commercial centre.

City planning committee chairman Matthew Bourke said hundreds of residents had attended community consultation sessions.

“From the feedback received, lord mayor Adrian Schrinner announced that the proposed changes to zoning around the Deagon train station would be excluded from the neighbourhood plan going forward,” Cr Bourke said.

“Feedback received on the revitalisation of the Sandgate Town Centre will be considered as the draft plan is prepared.

“This was only the first step in the consultation process and residents, businesses and community groups will again have the opportunity to have their say on a revised plan.”

Cr Bourke said the next stage of consultation would be on the draft plan to be released this year.

The local councillor Jared Cassidy, also Labor opposition leader, spoke at length during December’s final council meeting about the frustrations of residents who attended council’s consultation sessions.

“… Earlier on I stood up and said, yes, my community does need a renewed Sandgate neighbourhood plan, but I didn’t for one second think that we would have such a hollow process of consultation and such a poor outcome even in this very first stage of the neighbourhood plan,” Cr Cassidy told the chamber.

Cr Cassidy said the council’s consultation with the suburbs was “not good enough” and he was “not going to take this lying down”.

Source: www.brisbanetimes.com.au

 

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Brisbane

The leading eye surgeon in Brisbane lists the top bayside houses

The leading eye surgeon in Brisbane lists the top bayside houses

An iconic Wynnum home is back on the market after a record price was set three years ago.

The Queenslander from the 1890s, known as San Remo, is located in a 1113 m² block on the water with a pool.

Owner Les Manning said he fell in love with the property at 25 Waterloo Esplanade in Wynnum when he first saw it in 2016.

“It is a magnificent waterfront residence with direct access to the water and the small beach across the street,” said the distinguished Queensland eye surgeon.

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“To be a great family home was the big attraction for us, along with the view, the wonderful breeze and the direct access to the water.”

San Remo is mostly on one level and has a spacious all-round veranda with balustrades made of iron lace.

There are polished wooden floors, high ceilings and a marble fireplace.

There are formal living and dining rooms, a family room that opens onto the front porch, and an open kitchen and dining area that lead to the rear deck. The modern kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a cold room.

The master suite extends over the entire upper floor and includes the master bedroom with a walk-in closet that leads to an ensuite with bath and shower, a private balcony and a study.

One of the bedrooms on the ground floor has a bay window and access to a smaller room that can be used as a study or dressing room, while the third bedroom has access to a winter garden.

There are two bathrooms in addition to the master bath.

Outside on the flat, fenced block there is an underground pool and landscaped gardens.

“Many places in Wynnum and Manly that have water access or water views are on steep blocks,” said Dr. Manning.

“This particular house is mostly on the main level.”

Dr. Manning was trained by the renowned humanitarian and eye surgeon Professor Fred Hollows before receiving his scholarship in 1980.

Dr. Manning was also instrumental in setting up Queensland’s first Vitreo retinal unit in the Mater Hospital, which has restored vision to hundreds of blind patients.

He said San Remo was a great family home and he only sold because circumstances had changed.

He said he hoped the property would be passed on to another family who valued his character.

“I hope that the new owners will upgrade the property. Even if it is so beautiful, it can be improved and updated. “

Place Manly principal Marc Sorrentino said the house is one of the most iconic on the bay and has everything it takes to set a new record sale price.

“All of the properties that have had record prices in the area are waterfront homes that are larger than average,” he said.

“San Remo is located on a 1113 square meter property right on the water with a wide facade and in a quiet part of the promenade.

“It’s also a nice, nasty home.”

Mr. Sorrentino said that this property would “absolutely” set another record.

“The person who will buy it will be a casual buyer,” he said.

“You will be someone who has admired the house for a while and maybe missed it last time.”

 

 

Source: themediatimes.com

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