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Land purchase creates region’s largest environment reserve

environment reserve

Doonan Creek Environment Reserve in Peregian Springs is now the largest reserve in Sunshine Coast Council’s conservation estate thanks to the acquisition of an additional property.

The latest purchase adds 94 hectares to the existing reserve and brings it to an impressive 474 hectares in total.

Sunshine Coast Council Mayor Mark Jamieson said that additional land was acquired using funds generated by the Environment Levy, which is contributed to by all ratepayers.

“The importance of our Environment Levy land acquisition program is that it helps to grow our conservation network and provide opportunities for council to create new habitat to support our native plants and animals,” Mayor Jamieson said.

“The new parcel is adjacent to the existing Doonan Creek Environment Reserve and by consolidating it with the existing Reserve it will assist in providing more connected green spaces for our community.

“This purchase is particularly significant because it preserves our highly valued Maroochy-Noosa wallum biodiversity corridor and is covered entirely with native vegetation which is in excellent condition.

“This corridor includes diverse habitats such as coastal lowlands and floodplains that together form an essential corridor for our wildlife to move through the landscape.

“The Doonan Creek Environment Reserve builds on and complements the significant environmental values of council’s nearby Blue Heart project.

“It’s our council’s continued focus on preserving our important environmental assets and maintaining our desirable lifestyle that will see us realise our vision for the Sunshine Coast: Australia’s most sustainable region – healthy, smart, creative.”

Environment and Liveability Portfolio and Division 9 Councillor Maria Suarez said land acquisitions helped to protect our environment and helped to ensure the Sunshine Coast continued to be a great place to live into the future.

“This purchase contributes towards achieving our Environment and Liveability Strategy’s biodiversity objective to expand and connect our conservation estate,” Cr Suarez said.

“The Doonan Creek Environment Reserve, with the addition of this land parcel, will continue to protect our critically endangered rainforest and wetland, and our locally important wallum vegetation communities.

“This additional land will also protect more than two kilometres of Doonan Creek.

“Through implementation of the Doonan Creek Environment Reserve Management Plan this reserve will also provide opportunities to connect people with nature through conservation, recreation and education.

“And the community will be able to do just that this Saturday 5 June as we celebrate World Environment Day at Doonan Creek Environment Reserve with family-friendly fun, including tree planting.”

Sunshine Coast Council’s conservation estate now totals more than 7000 hectares and is one of the largest council-owned and/or managed conservation estates in south east Queensland.

 

Article Source: www.miragenews.com

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Brisbane

Brisbane Airport’s $1bn Third Terminal

Brisbane Airport

Brisbane Airport has unveiled plans to build a $1-billion third terminal that will connect its dual runways.

The proposed terminal will be a 250,000sq m integrated L-shaped building that services both domestic and international operations, positioned between the two runways.

While the airport’s design hasn’t been finalised it will be put before Brisbane Airport Development and Design Integrity Panel as well as up for community consultation before being signed off on.

Brisbane Airport Corporation (BAC) said the development would be marked for completion in 2032, however, the timeline would be moved forward if Brisbane was confirmed as the host of the 2032 Olympic Games.

“Brisbane Airport has been blessed with two great pieces of terminal architecture in the current domestic and international terminals,” a Brisbane Airport Corporation (BAC) spokesperson said.

“[The new terminal] will be a modern, sustainable green building that harnesses the best of Queensland—its sunshine—alongside engaging retail options and touchless, self-service operations.

“It will also open up new international route opportunities like we saw with Chicago and San Francisco pre-Covid.”

Brisbane, currently Australia’s third-busiest airport spanning a 2700-hectare site, recently completed the construction of its $1.3-billion, 3.3km second runway.

The new runway has now given the airport the largest aviation capacity of any city in Australia, allowing for up to 110 aircraft movements per hour, comparable to major international hubs like Singapore Changi Airport and Hong Kong International Airport.

Brisbane Airport Corporation is also set to spend another $2 billion on major projects over the next five years.

“The aviation industry is resilient and has weathered many storms,” head of infrastructure development Paul Coughlan said.

“Air travel will bounce back, as it did after the 11 September 2001 terror attacks and the global financial crisis. It has always rebounded, and it rebounds strongly.

“Now more than ever, it is crucial that we have the infrastructure and mechanisms in place to allow our great city and state to recover from Covid-19.

“As we emerge from the pandemic, Brisbane Airport will be in the best position possible to attract new airlines and new routes, connecting Brisbane to the world more than ever before.”

Along with a new northern integrated domestic and international terminal, BAC wants to connect the airport precincts together with a new Australian-first airport mass transit system.

As part of the Brisbane Airport 2020 masterplan, BAC is planning a mass transit system that could handle the forecasted 50 million passengers and 50,000 workers that will transit through the Airport precinct by 2040.

According to BAC, an elevated air-train transit system could handle 3200 passengers per hour and take no longer than five minutes.

 

Article Source: www.theurbandeveloper.com

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Gold Coast

Gold Coast’s green tinge with huge beachfront rainforest restoration

The City of Gold Coast is undertaking one of Australia’s largest ever beachfront rainforest restoration projects.

If you’ve ever taken in the natural beauty of the Gold Coast’s glorious beaches or strolled along the city’s golden coastline, chances are you’ve unknowingly appreciated littoral rainforest.

Littoral rainforest is a type of forest that grows along the beachfront, providing habitat for native flora and fauna and acting as an important buffer to coastal erosion and wind damage.

It’s a unique ecological community that is currently considered critically endangered, due to limited large-scale areas of it remaining intact.

To protect the Gold Coast’s natural environment and expand its ecological footprint, the City of Gold Coast is undertaking one of Australia’s largest-ever beachfront rainforest restoration projects.

The project involves the restoration of 37 hectares of littoral rainforest within the Federation Walk Coastal Reserve at The Spit, Main Beach.

beachfront

A total contribution of $8 million has been provided across all three levels of government to transform the eastern side of The Spit and add to the Gold Coast’s biodiversity offering.

The project is expected to take twelve months for plantings to become established, and a further ten years to restore the native forest.

Restoration works will involve weed control, the planting of 350,000 native littoral rainforest tree species, and a world-class irrigation system that will use recycled water to mitigate bushfire risk and assist with rainforest establishment.

The project is set to create one of the largest areas of littoral rainforest in the country and deliver valuable greenspace for the Gold Coast’s future.

Visitors to the reserve will be able to enjoy a unique nature-based recreational experience, under the cool canopy of littoral rainforest and other coastal vegetation communities while enjoying the world-class ocean park destination at The Spit. 

Local community group ‘Friends of Federation Walk’ have been involved in protecting The Spit’s coastal reserve for more than 20 years.

The volunteer group is headed up by Lyn Wright – a passionate Gold Coaster who is focussed on ensuring present and future generations of the community can enjoy, appreciate and care for The Spit.

“We’re absolutely thrilled with the plans presented by the city to restore the native vegetation to this area of the coastal reserve,” says Wright.

“When you visit Federation Walk, you feel like you’re in another world. It’s a very special place and it’s important that we protect and enhance it.

“Thousands of volunteers have been involved in the ongoing Friends of Federation Walk program over the last twenty years.

“We’ve worked closely with the council over this time to help promote the importance of looking after our natural areas, as well as driving community interest in initiatives such as tree planting events.”

 The Gold Coast is one of the most biodiverse cities in Australia and is home to internationally acclaimed areas such as the World Heritage-listed Gondwana Rainforests and the Ramsar Convention-listed coastal wetlands of southern Moreton Bay.

The project will also contribute to the city’s aim of achieving the target of 51 per cent vegetation cover.

 

Article Source: inqld.com.au

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Brisbane

City Golf Course to Become Biggest Park in 50 Years

City Golf Course

Victoria Park’s transformation into a public park will begin in July with 45 ha of green space to be delivered to the community.

The 18-hole golf course will close at the end of next month before work begins to create the “biggest new park in 50 years”, according to Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner.

“We invite residents to explore the hectares of open space as we progress plans for the long-term transformation, which will include more native bushland, trees and adventure experiences,” Schrinner said.

“Initially, residents can expect to see the 33 existing bunkers filled, pathway improvements made and increased plantings.

“While we work to deliver the Victoria Park Vision there will always be significant open space remaining accessible to the public.”

City Golf Course

▲ Newly unveiled artist’s impressions of the reimagined Victoria Park show a tree canopy walk and pedestrian connections. Image: Brisbane City Council 

The Brisbane City Council’s City Parklands Service, which transformed Roma Street Parklands and South Bank, will manage the transformation of the current pay-and-play golf course into parkland.

Initial fears the green land parcel would be subject to development have been put to bed.

Plans for the site included a green amphitheatre, a tree canopy walk and a high ropes course, as well as a children’s water park, a 1.4ha lake, skate park and tennis courts.

City Golf Course

▲ More than 16,000 people contributed to the design-led transformation of the golf course into parklands. 

A significant tree planting project will take place to increase tree cover in the park from 10 to 60 per cent.

Based on feedback, a proposed events space was canned and the Tree House Lookout was reduced in size and height.

Victoria Park’s original waterways would also be re-established as “natural cooling, cleansing and drainage systems, which would provide habitat for wildlife, and help to address urban heat island issues nearby.”

 

Article Source: www.theurbandeveloper.com

 

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