Labor Unveils $6.6bn Affordable Housing Plan to Build 250,000 New Homes - Queensland Property Investor
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Labor Unveils $6.6bn Affordable Housing Plan to Build 250,000 New Homes

Labor Unveils $6.6bn Affordable Housing Plan

Labor has announced a ten-year plan to build 250,000 new homes across Australia, including 20,000 during its first term in government if it wins the election.

The $6.6 billion investment would see 250,000 new homes for low income and working families, key workers such as nurses, police, carers and teachers and women over 55, the fastest emerging group of Australians at risk of homelessness.

Subsidies of $8,500 per year would be offered to investors building new homes in return for cheaper rent for eligible tenants.

Opposition leader Bill Shorten unveiled the multibillion-dollar plan in his address yesterday at Labor’s three-day national conference in Adelaide.

“Building more affordable housing is infrastructure policy. It is cities policy. It is jobs and productivity policy,” he said.

The plan would see a family paying the national rental average save up to $92 each week.

“When you provide an affordable home for hard-working people, you give them the level playing-field and fair start they need,” he said.

Shorten said Labor would work with the states and territories, local councils, and community housing providers to make sure the rollout of homes were built “where they’re needed most” and would “go to the people who need them most”.

“Not foreign investors, nor international students.”

Affordable Housing Plan

The new homes would be accessible for all ages and for people with a disability, with Shorten describing the new homes as “more energy efficient, meaning lower power bills”, also offering a rental discount of 20 per cent.

Describing Labor as a “party of home ownership, and a party of affordable housing and community housing”, Shorten used the speech as an opportunity to call on industry super to “step up” and invest in affordable housing projects.

And of course, the opposition leader touched upon the hotly debated campaign election issue: negative gearing.

“This is a boost for renters and for the liveability of our growing suburbs… Alongside our plans to make negative gearing fairer, it will drive a boom in construction jobs and apprenticeships,” Shorten said.

A recent report published by the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) found Australia needed to triple its social housing by 2036, faced with a shortfall of 433,000 social housing dwellings.

Labor Unveils $6.6bn Affordable Housing Plan to Build 250,000 New Homes

Property industry bodies welcome Labor’s announcement

Property Council chief executive Ken Morrison welcomed the incentives, but said they are “no substitute” for the supply of housing which is funded by 2.1 million property investors, “including those who access negative gearing”.

Housing affordability remains a critical issue for many Australians, an issue Morrison says is often overshadowed in the media by Melbourne and Sydney’s cooling markets.

“It makes sense to harness the investment capacity of the private sector to deliver affordable housing,” Morrison said.

“Labor’s incentives for investors to deliver affordable housing will make a contribution to meeting that need while also providing a boost to our construction industry, a key driver of economic activity.”

Planning schemes, land supply, and property taxes, which make up around 25 per cent of the cost of a new house are all part of the housing affordability mix, Morrison added, “there is no single ‘silver bullet’ solution”.

Urban Taskforce chief executive Chris Johnson said many different approaches are needed to tackle the hugely complex housing affordability issue.

“State and territory governments still have a responsibility to ensure that enough appropriately-zoned land is available in inner-ring suburbs to ensure sufficient housing supply,” Johnson said.

“Infrastructure levies must be kept under control to ensure that these do not add to the cost of housing production.”

 

Source: theurbandeveloper.com

 

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Brisbane

The Brisbane suburbs where property values will rise

The Brisbane suburbs where property values will rise.
Red Hill is tipped to join the million-dollar house price club, as property values in Brisbane soar.
Economists have predicted a staggering 20 per cent rise in the median house price over the next three years and new analysis from the SRP Group reveals which Brisbane suburbs will be leading the way.
Red Hill, Keperra, Mount Gravatt, Arana Hills and Rochedale South top the list.
It means Brisbane, where there is already 18 suburbs with a median house price above $1 million, would continue to buck the national property downturn.
But Antonia Mercorella, from Real Estate Institute Queensland, insists the Sunshine State’s capital is still affordable.
“It’s really just a matter of doing your research and looking at what’s available,” she said.
BIS Oxford Economics analyst Angie Zigomanis said most increases won’t be noticed for another 12 months.  “We’ll really be back ended towards the last two years of that three year forecast period,” he said.
Source: www.9news.com.au
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Brisbane

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most

Brisbane’s rent prices have remained relatively steady over the past 12 months, but that doesn’t mean there hasn’t been any big changes in rent prices across the city. So which suburbs have seen the biggest price hikes, and which have seen the biggest reductions?

When it comes to units, Bardon recorded the highest jump in rent price in the past 12 months. The north-western suburb saw an 18 per cent increase up to a median weekly rent price of $360, which is consistent with a 20 per cent increase over the past five years.

Brooke Rowley, property management business developer for Ray White Paddington, said smaller units have recently popped up in the suburb and were likely to account for the bump in price.

“We have height restrictions so we don’t have all the high-rises, but we do have a lot of smaller units and townhouses,” she said. “They’re not high rise, the top would be three levels. But nice, and fairly new.”

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most 1

Rowley said most of the rental interest in the area came from more established renters who were interested in the location and surrounding amenities.

“Bardon is the catchment zone for two very good schools, Bardon State School and Rainworth State School. A lot of people look for the good schools, and then want to stay in that area. [We see] more professionals sharers and families because of the schools, and close proximity to the city. [There’s also] easy access to get to Mt Coot-tha and the western suburbs.”

Elsewhere, Yerongpilly in Brisbane’s south saw a strong 14.3 per cent increase in unit rent prices year-on-year, while nearby suburb Holland Park jumped a similarly strong 11.1 per cent.

Meanwhile, house rent prices increased the most in Fortitude Valley, with the central suburb posting a 16.3 per cent jump. The median weekly rent price was $500 in the area. Leasing associate Connor Hadwen, of Living Here Cush Partners, said the increase was likely due to the market catching up to the recent apartment boom.

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most 3

“The oversupply of apartments has mostly been filled at the moment,” he said. “So compared to five years ago, the rental prices are returning to normal levels. It’s just the suburb growth matching back to normal levels.”

In fact, Domain economist Trent Wiltshire said the most notable broad trend in Brisbane’s rental market in the past 12 months was a 6.25 per cent increase in rent price for units in inner-city Brisbane suburbs like Fortitude Valley.

“That’s a surprise given what we know has been happening in the Brisbane apartment market in the inner city,” he said. “Brisbane’s gone through a huge apartment building boom over the last few years. Despite that, rents have increased over the past year by 6 per cent.

“It’s only up by 6 per cent over five years, so it has been held down over the last few years by the big building boom, but it’s just jumped in the past year. This says to me that there’s ongoing strong demand for new apartments.”

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most 4

Mr Hadwen said he had seen strong interstate and international interest in Fortitude Valley, and its surrounding suburbs of New Farm, Teneriffe, and Newstead.

“We tend to see not huge families coming to live here, but people moving here for employment opportunities. [People] wanting to live close to the city.”

Another suburb that posted a large increase in house rent price was Fig Tree Pocket in Brisbane’s south-west. It saw a 12.5 per cent jump for a median weekly rent price of $675. Closer to the CBD, Ashgrove saw an increase of 10.6 percent making for a median weekly house rent price of $575.

On the other end of the spectrum, the apartment rental market in Rocklea in Brisbane’s south saw the biggest dip across the city, with rent dropping 8.9 per cent year on year consistent with an 8.9 per cent drop in the past five years. The current median weekly rent price for units in the area is $280.

The Brisbane suburbs where rent prices have increased most 5

When it comes to houses, the western suburb of Chelmer saw the biggest drop at 11.2 per cent. This could be an anomaly, however, given the area’s 26.2 per cent increase over the past five years. The current median weekly rent price for houses in the area is $675.

 

Source: www.domain.com.au

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Brisbane

Queensland leads the way in market recovery

Queensland leads the way in market recovery

Demand has started to increase in the property market on the back of the recent federal election results and interest rate cuts, with Brisbane and Mackay in Queensland leading the road to recovery.

REA’s Property Outlook for July has revealed the “ScoMo bounce” and two interest rate cuts were breathing new life into Australian property, with demand starting to increase and slowly flowing through to many indicators.

Search activity has seen a bump, particularly in Melbourne and Sydney’s hard hit markets, clearance rates in premium suburbs are getting back to high levels, and many mining towns are returning to growth after five years of negative conditions, according to the report.

realestate.com.au’s Chief Economist Nerida Conisbee said rental growth in these areas started some time ago, but a recovery is now following suit.

“Queensland is leading the way in the recovery,” Ms Conisbee said in the report. “Brisbane has been the first capital city off the block in terms of price growth, and Mackay is right now the top regional growth area in Australia.”

She added that jobs growth is also driving rental demand, which continues to be highest in Hobart, Gold Coast and Melbourne, and while the extreme price growth in Hobart now seems to be over, Launceston is taking over. Regional Victoria was also doing well, with many suburbs in Ballarat, Bendigo and Geelong experiencing never before seen property demand.

But according to the report, any real uplift in the number of people listing properties for sale is yet to be seen and pricing data is yet to reflect a change in conditions, and Ms Conisbee warned that while much of this sounds promising, there are some dark clouds looming on the horizon.

“Although buyers love an interest rate cut (we see an increase in search activity onrealestate.com.au almost as soon as it is announced), the Australian economy isn’t looking particularly healthy,” she said in the report.

“While many economic indicators have been poor for some time now, the bright spark has always been low unemployment. With this creeping up and the Reserve Bank pushing through two interest rate cuts very quickly, the positive effect of cheaper finance may not be enough to offset the fact that people are beginning to lose their job. Could it be that the worst for property is still be to come?”

Ms Conisbee said if the interest rate cuts were enough to stimulate the economy and property prices continued to see a rebound, we were still looking at a very different property market to what it was like during the boom, with investor lending down 45 per cent from peak and unlikely to make a full recovery any time soon.

“Buyers from Asia, a key market for new development, have dropped dramatically,” she reported. “Over the past 12 months alone, property seekers from China have dropped by over 60 per cent to the lowest level we have ever recorded, and confidence in the new apartment sector is low following some high-profile structural issues.”

 

 

Source: eliteagent.com

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