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Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

 

Brisbane has an extensive and growing network of bikeways.

Through the Better Bikeways 4 Brisbane program, Brisbane City Council is investing $100 million between July 2016 and 2020 on bikeways to improve access to local destinations and the city centre. The Lord Mayor’s signature bikeway projects include:

Training rides

Brisbane has many popular training rides. Here are two of the best loops to try.

Mt Coot-tha loop

The ride begins at the base of Mt Coot-tha on Sir Samuel Griffith Drive. Ride in a clockwise direction for a moderate in-the-saddle climb, or in an anti-clockwise direction for a challenging, leg-burning ascent. The loop is approximately 12 kilometres. Ramp up your hill training with this heart-pumping ride and be rewarded with amazing views at the summit lookout.

Brisbane River loop

This 35-40 kilometre ride includes bikeways and on-road riding in South Brisbane, Brisbane City, Milton, Auchenflower, Toowong, St Lucia, Indooroopilly, Chelmer, Graceville, Tennyson, Yeronga, Dutton Park, Highgate Hill and West End. There are lots of variations to the loop and it can be completed in either direction (generally anti-clockwise for training), with many people beginning and ending the ride at South Bank.

For more information on training rides and other bikeways, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au

Brisbane Cycling Festival

The annual Brisbane Cycling Festival brings the best of the world’s track cyclists to the Anna Meares Velodrome at Chandler. It also includes competitive road races and mass participation events.

 

Brisbane’s bikeways

Brisbane’s bikeways are a great way of getting to and from where you are going without the hassles of finding a car park and being stuck in traffic.

Ride around the city

Council is building a bikeway network for the whole city. To keep up with new bikeways and consultations, sign up to Cycling Brisbane (see page 2).

For suggestions about where to ride, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au/bikeways/brisbane-bikeway-rides

Beat the heat

Brisbane summers are hot, so it’s good to know that leafy parts of the city can be more than five degrees cooler than treeless areas, which make them more pleasant places to ride. Bikeways are often located through parks and alongside waterways.

You will find stretches of leafy shade along:

  • Bulimba Creek Bikeway (map 13)
  • Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway (map 8)
  • Enoggera Creek Bikeway (map 9)

Alternatively, you may want to consider an electric bike (e-bike) to help keep you riding all year round. E-bikes give a power boost provided you are pedalling. They may help you to keep riding through heat and humidity, and over hills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Inner North to City Centre

The North Brisbane Bikeway is being constructed in stages to connect northern suburbs such as Aspley, Chermside, Kedron, Lutwyche, Wooloowin and Albion to the city centre. The project is a partnership between Council and the State Government.

Currently the stages from Albion are complete, and construction is underway to extend this to Wooloowin.

Council has consulted on a 1.2 kilometre connection from the intersection of Chalk Street and Bridge Street in Wooloowin to the Kedron Brook Bikeway adjacent to Bradshaw Street in Lutwyche.

The existing separated bikeway runs south from Windsor Park towards Victoria Park, and is a direct connection to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Brisbane Showgrounds. From here, the bikeway is shining brighter than ever, following the completion of the Normanby Fiveways Bikeway lighting project. The bikeway continues through Roma Street Parklands and into the city centre.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner South to City Centre

People on bikes travelling from the south can use the Veloway 1 that runs alongside the Pacific Motorway. This connects directly to the Kangaroo Point Bikeway and the city centre.

Use the bikeway to access the city centre from Tarragindi, Holland Park, Greenslopes, Buranda and Woolloongabba. An improved link is being constructed between Holland Park and Tarragindi that will provide a safer bikeway connection to the suburbs beyond.

Destinations on the Veloway 1 include the PA Hospital, Griffith University and stations along the South East Busway.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner East to City Centre

You can ride to the city from the east on both sides of Brisbane River.

From the northern side, use the recently completed 1.2 kilometre Lores Bonney Riverwalk from Bretts Wharf Ferry Terminal to Cameron Rocks Reserve at Breakfast Creek. Continue along the river through Newstead, Teneriffe and New Farm Park. Use a short section of road to connect with the New Farm Riverwalk to Howard Smith Wharves and beyond to Eagle Street and the City Botanic Gardens.

On the south side of the river, use the off-road shared path on the river side of Wynuum Road. A new bike path is being constructed at East Brisbane as part of the Wynnum Road corridor upgrade. A mix of quiet roads and shared pathways takes you under the Story Bridge through Captain Burke Park, and connects to the new Kangaroo Point Bikeway and over the Goodwill Bridge to the city.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner West to City Centre

From Kenmore, Indooroopilly and Fig Tree Pocket, use the Centenary Bikeway that runs adjacent to the Centenary Freeway to Toowong. You can also link to the Mt Coot-tha Botanical Gardens via a dedicated active travel bridge.

Ride through Toowong along Sylvan Road, which now utilises peak period bike lanes. Between 6-9am for inbound traffic and 4-7pm for outbound traffic, from Monday to Friday, parking spaces along Sylvan Road are a no standing zone, meaning bike riders have more on-road space.

Connect with the Bicentennial Bikeway to complete your journey to the city along the Brisbane River. The Bicentennial Bikeway features separated pedestrian and bikeway pathways along its entire 2.7 kilometre length.

cycling brisbane

Mitchelton to Toombul (Kedron Brook Bikeway)

The Kedron Brook Bikeway stretches for almost 20 kilometres from Mitchelton to Nundah using a mixture of off-road shared pathways and separated bikeways. It runs through Everton Park, Stafford, Grange, Gordon Park, Lutwyche and Kedron.

Use the bikeway to get to local schools, shops, sports clubs and busway stations. You can also access many creekside parks, picnic facilities, barbecues and a number of dog off-leash areas.

.Bike Paths Brisbane

Toombul to Sandgate

These bikeways connect north Brisbane suburbs to the Sandgate Foreshore and Shorncliffe Pier. The Jim Soorley Bikeway has links with Toombul Station and shops, and the Nundah Criterium Track. From here it continues along the Kedron Brook towards Nudgee Beach and the Boondall Wetlands.

Connect with the completed Gateway Upgrade North separated bikeway towards Bracken Ride, Deagon and Sandgate, with links to North Boondall Station and a range of leisure and recreation facilities including Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre and Bracken Ridge BMX Facility.

Quiet street links take you to the water with the Sandgate Foreshore to the north (and onward connections to Clontarf) and Shorncliffe Pier to the south.

cycling brisbane

McDowall to Virginia (Downfall Creek Bikeway)

The Downfall Creek Bikeway connects suburbs such as McDowall, Craigslea, Chermside, Geebung and Virgina with important facilities including Westfield Chermside, Chermside Library, Chermside Pool, Seventh Brigade and Marchant Parks, and Virginia Train Station.

7th Brigade Park features a 500-metre street skills course and is a great location for children to develop their bike riding skills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

McDowall to Bracken Ridge (Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway)

The path runs through McDowall, Aspley, Carseldine, Fitzgibbon and Bracken Ride. It connects to a number of local parks, Aspley Shopping Centre, Carseldine Train Station, the Emily Seebohm Aquatic Centre and the brand new Bracken Ridge BMX Facility. The new state-of-the-art facility is the largest of its kind in Australia, with 640 metres of asphalt track suitable for beginner through to more advanced riders.

cycling brisbane

Ashgrove to Herston (Ithaca Creek and Enoggera Creek Bikeways)

These bikeways link the north west suburbs of Ashgrove, Red Hill and Newmarket with the North Brisbane Bikeway to create a connection to the city centre and northern suburbs.

These bikeways provide access to a host of inner-north green spaces and sports clubs including Spencer Park, Finsbury Park and Downey Park.

cycling brisbane

Woolloongabba to the University of Queensland (UQ)

Travelling to the University of Queensland has never been easier thanks to the recently completed Woolloongabba Bikeway. The Woolloongabba Bikeway extends:

  • 1.1 kilometres along Stanley Street between Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba and Dock Street, South Brisbane (separated bikeway), and
  • 1.4 kilometres along Annerley Road between Stanley Street, Woolloongabba and Gladstone Road, Dutton Park (a mix of separated bikeway and on-road bike lanes).

The Stanley Street section provides convenient access to the Gabba Stadium, Mater Hospital, Queensland Children’s Hospital, South Bank and the city centre. Heading up Annerley Road provides access to Boggo Road Urban Village and the forthcoming Inner City South State Secondary College. The bikeway connects you straight to the Eleanor Schonell Bridge and through to UQ and beyond to St Lucia.

The Eleanor Schonell Bridge is the first bridge in Australia exclusively designed for buses, bikes and walking. People riding bikes have access to a separated bikeway, which provides safe and convenient access to the university for students and staff.

No bike? There are CityCycle stations located at both ends of the bridge and at docking stations along Annerley Road and Stanley Street.

You can read more about the Woolloongabba Bikeway upgrade project on Council’s website.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Tarragindi to Norman Park (Norman Creek Bikeway)

The Norman Creek Bikeway stretches from Tarragindi to the Brisbane River at Norman Park, and provides convenient access to many local facilities including busway stations, train stations, Stones Corner Library and shops, Langlands Pool, schools, sports clubs and the Norman Park Ferry.

The bikeway also connects with paths to University of Queensland, PA Hospital and the city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

Wynnum Manly Foreshore

This seafront bikeway provides access to Manly boat harbour and marina, Manly Pool, Manly Village, parks including Wynnum Wading Pool and playground (with Brisbane’s only tidal wading pool), and Wynnum Pier.

Connect with train stations on the Cleveland Line to create an enjoyable day out on the Wynnum Manly Foreshore.

brisbane city bike paths

Murarrie to Wishart (Bulimba Creek Bikeway)

The Bulimba Creek Bikeway stretches from Murrarie to Wishart. Use the bikeway to travel to Westfield Carindale, Carindale Library, Minnippi Parklands, Carindale Recreation Reserve and a number of other parks and open spaces.

Minnippi Parklands includes a 1.6km circular bike route around a lagoon. The smooth, flat pathway makes this a great location to learn to ride.

The northern end of the bikeway finishes at Murrarie Recreation Reserve, which includes a criterium racing track. The reserve is also very close to Murrarie Station.

brisbane city bike paths

Runcorn to Mount Gravatt

This route between Runcorn and Mount Gravatt provides convenient access to many local facilities including busways, train stations, Runcorn Pool, parks, Garden City Library and Westfield Garden City.

It also connects with the Veloway 1 bikeway, which goes from Eight Mile Plains in the south to Brisbane’s city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

QUT Kelvin Grove to QUT Gardens Point

Travelling by bike between QUT Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point is a great option. This route also provides convenient access to Roma Street Parkland, the city centre and South Bank. You can also ride across two green bridges, the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge, where no vehicle access is permitted.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Murarrie to Hamilton

The Murarrie to Hamilton bike ride connects you from the Murarrie train station to the Bretts Wharf ferry terminal via the Sir Leo Hielscher Bridge on the Gateway Motorway. The bridge is an important river crossing and includes an off-road shared path. To the north, the route connects with Kingsford Smith Drive and the Lores Bonney Riverwalk, and links you to inner eastern suburbs to Brisbane’s city centre. To the south, the route provides access to Carindale, Wishart and Eight Mile Plains via the link with Bulimba Creek Bikeway.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Darra to Fig Tree Pocket

These two routes provide convenient access to facilities such as the Darra train station, Mount Ommaney Shopping Centre and Mount Ommaney Library. Choose whether you take the most direct route, or ride via Rocks Riverside Park.

Use these off-road routes to try and replace short car journeys with your bike. For trips to the city, both routes connect to the bikeway that runs alongside the Centenary Freeway towards Toowong and beyond to the city centre.

Bike Paths Brisbane

Eight Mile Plains to Tarragindi

This route runs from the Eight Mile Plains bus station to Tarragindi, with an ongoing direct connection to the city centre. It includes links to Westfield Garden City, Garden City Bus Station and Library, sports facilities and Griffith University Mt Gravatt and Nathan campuses.

At Eight Mile Plains, the route connects to Wishart, Carindale and beyond via Bulimba Creek Bikeway. At Tarragindi, there is a link to the Norman Creek Bikeway, which provides access to busway stations, Stones Corner Library, Langlands Pool and other leisure facilities, schools and the Norman Creek ferry terminal.

Bike Paths

West End to City Centre

This riverside route starts at Orleigh Park and travels along the separated bike path through Riverside Parklands to Davies Park, where you can check out the Davies Park Markets on a Saturday. Ride on-road before joining the off-road bike path that links to the Kurilpa Bridge (walking, bikes and rideables only) into the city centre.

For journeys to the east and south, continue along the river towards South Bank rather than using the bridge. This route also provides easy access to the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Queensland Cultural Centre, South Brisbane train station and the Cultural Centre bus station.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner City Connections

Brisbane isn’t called the river city for nothing. Use this map to find out how to get from the northside of the river to the south, and how to head east and west using two green bridges (the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge) where no vehicle access is permitted, and the separated path on the Go Between Bridge.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

 

 

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Brisbane

Record auction figures in December as Australia’s property market plays catch up

Auction

A surge in post lockdown supply coupled with buoyant market conditions, led to unprecedented levels of auction activity across Australia in the final three months of 2021.

CoreLogic’s Quarterly Auction Market Review shows 42,918 properties were taken to auction across the combined capital cities in the three months to December 2021, an 85.1% increase from the previous quarter and more than double (109.5%) the December 2020 figures.

CoreLogic’s Research Director Tim Lawless says several factors resulted in the surge in auctions, including some catch-up from the September quarter when the largest auctions markets were weighted down by lockdowns as well as a pickup in activity following the seasonally slower conditions of winter.

“The large number of auctions held through the December quarter also reflects the strong selling conditions that were present, which motivated vendors to capitalise on strong buyer demand and the significant rise in values seen through the pandemic,” he says.

“Auctions as a way of selling tend to be more popular during a sellers’ market; in this situation buyers are highly competitive and incentivised to outbid rival purchasers in order to secure a property. During cooler market conditions an auction may not attract as many registered bidders or as much competitive bidding.”

In Australia’s two biggest auction markets, Melbourne had 19,788 auctions and a clearance rate of 69.7% for the December quarter compared to Sydney, where 14,906 auctions were held at a clearance rate of 69.9%.

Across the combined capitals, the quarterly clearance rate of 71.3% was only slightly down on the previous quarter results of 71.7%.

However, as the quarter progressed and the volume of auctions held increased, the clearance rate progressively trended lower to 61.1% in the week ending 19 December, 2021.

Mr Lawless says higher auction volumes will often correspond with lower clearance rates as demand becomes more thinly stretched.

“The surge in the number of auctions through the final quarter of 2021 was accompanied by a consistent trend towards lower clearance rates, with this trend evident across each of the capital cities,” he says.

“The drop in clearance rates implies demand didn’t quite keep pace with the level of auction supply during the quarter.”

In the smaller capitals Brisbane (3027 auctions, clearance rate of 74.9%), Adelaide (2902 auctions, 80.5%) and Canberra (1949 auctions, 82.4%) also recorded significant increases in volumes compared to Q3 2021, and the corresponding quarter in 2020.

auction At a granular level, the suburb of Wishart, 12km south-east of Brisbane’s CBD, recorded a 100% clearance rate, the highest in the country, with all 28 properties scheduled for auction in the December quarter selling under the hammer.

The heightened auction volumes in Brisbane and Adelaide echoed the cities respective housing strength, where values continued to rise at cyclical highs through December, prompting a higher proportion of properties being taken to auction.

Auctions in Australia’s regional areas also increased substantially over the quarter. Larger centres such as Newcastle, the Illawarra, Geelong and the Gold and Sunshine coasts in Queensland, each saw a surge in auction volumes, reflective of the tight housing market conditions that currently exist in the country’s popular coastal areas and lifestyle-oriented markets.

In the week ending January 23, 2022, close to 460 auctions are scheduled across the capital cities, almost 40% higher when compared to the same period a year ago. However, Mr Lawless says it’s too early to forecast the auction market trend likely to prevail in 2022.

“Overall advertised supply levels generally remain below average across most of the capitals suggesting sellers are still benefitting from strong selling conditions,” Mr Lawless says.

“Auction volumes tend to ramp up through early February and move through a seasonal peak in the weeks prior to Easter. Over the medium term we are expecting listing numbers to gradually normalise which should see buyers regaining some leverage in the market over time.  If this is the case, we could see more vendors reverting to private treaty sales rather than auctions as competitive tension amongst buyers eases.”

A full city-by-city suburb analysis, where at least 20 auction results were reported over the December quarter, can be found in the report.

 

Article Source: www.corelogic.com.au

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Brisbane

High Rollers Spending Big in South-East Queensland’s Premium Market

Market

The Gold Coast continues to rise above the pandemic, providing bang for buck for many ultra high-net worth individuals who bought into the unyielding prime residential market.

The region recorded a 156 per cent increase in annual sales turnover for prime residential property, the biggest in the country, according to Knight Frank’s Australian Prime Residential Review report.

Knight Frank head of residential research Michelle Ciesielski, who authored the report, said Gold Coast property had chalked up a 10.5 per cent increase in prime prices, the second-highest behind Sydney at 10.7 per cent.

“The Gold Coast saw the biggest rise in prime annual sales turnover at 156 per cent, followed by Brisbane at 135 per cent,” Ciesielski said.

“Gold Coast prime properties were on the market 19 days less on average [than the previous quarter], the biggest reduction across Australia.”

The Gold Coast also offered more for your money.

According to Knight Frank data, US$1 million would buy you 124sq m of luxury floor space in the Gold Coast, while in Melbourne it could buy about 88sq m and a paltry 44sq m in Sydney.

Prime residential performance, third quarter 2021

Region Capital Growth YoY Sales Volume YoY Gross rental yield
Sydney 10.7% 119% 2.07%
Melbourne 6.5% 85% 2.69%
Brisbane 8.4% 135% 2.41%
Perth 10.4% 120% 1.78%
Gold Coast 10.5% 156% 3.48%

^Source: Knight Frank Australian Prime Residential Review

Sherpa Property Group chief executive Christie Leet told The Urban Developer late last year that beachfront prices at nearly $20,000 per square metre were “towards the top end, well and truly”.

“There’s a fair argument that we might have hit a peak,” Leet said.

“But there’s still plenty of people out there buying tower sites that are going to take three or four years to develop.”

Towards the end of 2021 there were more than 50 residential projects with an estimated investment value of $4.8 billion under construction on the Gold Coast.

Nationally, the third quarter of 2021 was the second highest on record for prime sales, recording 1971 properties sold, while the volume of prime sales was up 119 per cent across the year ending September 2021.

Knight Frank forecast prime prices would increase 11 per cent across 2021, and a further 8 per cent in 2022.

Luxury rental prices on the Gold Coast have risen 10 per cent with yields the strongest in the Australian prime residential market at 3.48 per cent.

The pace of development of prime apartments and townhouses across Australia has slowed. About 26,700 new high-end apartments and townhouses were built in 2020, while the pipeline was 42 per cent less for 2021 with just 15,500 under construction.

Almost half of these new apartments are for the Melbourne market (7450), while Sydney and the Gold Coast were slated for more than 2000 properties each.

Globally the strongest prime residential capital growth was recorded in Miami, followed by Seoul, Shanghai, Moscow and Toronto.

Sydney was ranked 14th, followed by the Gold Coast (15th) and Perth (16th). Brisbane was at 21, while Melbourne came in with a middling performance at 24.

 

Article Source: www.theurbandeveloper.com

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Opinion

How home loan mortgages rose in 2021 to record levels

home loan

Lender records were broken in every state and territory except WA, according to the ABS data

Purchases by NSW owner occupiers came with mortgages sat at around $770,000, according to the latest lending data.

The national average mortgage size for owner-occupiers has reached a record high of $595,568 according to ABS data.

Records were broken in every state and territory except WA.

The national mortgage was up $92,404, an 18% hike over the year.

The November ABS Lending Indicators, released 14 January, advised the loans were for the purchase of new and existing dwellings.

The national average mortgage size for owner-occupiers has reached a record high of $595,568 according to new ABS data out today.

Records were broken in every state and territory except WA, according to the ABS data in original terms.

Victorian home buyers saw the biggest jump in their mortgages, up 24% or $120,000 to $618,602.

Average new owner-occupier mortgage size, November 2021

Amount Year-on-year change
National
$595,568 $92,404 18.4%
NSW
$769,459 $125,112 19.4%
Vic
$618,602 $120,032 24.1%
Qld
$513,649 $73,604 16.7%
WA
$439,578 $22,868 5.5%
SA
$421,801 $38,016 9.9%
ACT
$585,859 $58,434 11.1%
TAS
$445,915 $73,175 19.6%
NT
$433,333 $53,271 14%

“Demand for Aussie housing remains firm, but affordability has decreased because home prices have surged more than wages,” Ryan Felsman, senior economist at CommSec noted.

“In November housing stock was high and the country’s two largest states were freshly out of lockdown, so it’s no surprise to see a rise in new lending,” RateCity.com.au research director, Sally Tindall, said.

“Growth in property prices is starting to slow on the back of fixed rate rises and a crackdown by the regulator, but the opening up of borders this year will increase demand, keeping prices moving north,” she forecast.

The data did not include refinancing, nor renovation loans.

Renovation loans surged by 18 per cent in November to a record $569 million. The value of lending for renovations is up by a massive 115 per cent on a year ago.

Canstar analysis showed Australian mortgage holders refinanced $15.72 billion worth of loans to a new lender in November 2021, down 2.3% from October.

 

Article Source: www.urban.com.au

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