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Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

 

Brisbane has an extensive and growing network of bikeways.

Through the Better Bikeways 4 Brisbane program, Brisbane City Council is investing $100 million between July 2016 and 2020 on bikeways to improve access to local destinations and the city centre. The Lord Mayor’s signature bikeway projects include:

Training rides

Brisbane has many popular training rides. Here are two of the best loops to try.

Mt Coot-tha loop

The ride begins at the base of Mt Coot-tha on Sir Samuel Griffith Drive. Ride in a clockwise direction for a moderate in-the-saddle climb, or in an anti-clockwise direction for a challenging, leg-burning ascent. The loop is approximately 12 kilometres. Ramp up your hill training with this heart-pumping ride and be rewarded with amazing views at the summit lookout.

Brisbane River loop

This 35-40 kilometre ride includes bikeways and on-road riding in South Brisbane, Brisbane City, Milton, Auchenflower, Toowong, St Lucia, Indooroopilly, Chelmer, Graceville, Tennyson, Yeronga, Dutton Park, Highgate Hill and West End. There are lots of variations to the loop and it can be completed in either direction (generally anti-clockwise for training), with many people beginning and ending the ride at South Bank.

For more information on training rides and other bikeways, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au

Brisbane Cycling Festival

The annual Brisbane Cycling Festival brings the best of the world’s track cyclists to the Anna Meares Velodrome at Chandler. It also includes competitive road races and mass participation events.

 

Brisbane’s bikeways

Brisbane’s bikeways are a great way of getting to and from where you are going without the hassles of finding a car park and being stuck in traffic.

Ride around the city

Council is building a bikeway network for the whole city. To keep up with new bikeways and consultations, sign up to Cycling Brisbane (see page 2).

For suggestions about where to ride, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au/bikeways/brisbane-bikeway-rides

Beat the heat

Brisbane summers are hot, so it’s good to know that leafy parts of the city can be more than five degrees cooler than treeless areas, which make them more pleasant places to ride. Bikeways are often located through parks and alongside waterways.

You will find stretches of leafy shade along:

  • Bulimba Creek Bikeway (map 13)
  • Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway (map 8)
  • Enoggera Creek Bikeway (map 9)

Alternatively, you may want to consider an electric bike (e-bike) to help keep you riding all year round. E-bikes give a power boost provided you are pedalling. They may help you to keep riding through heat and humidity, and over hills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Inner North to City Centre

The North Brisbane Bikeway is being constructed in stages to connect northern suburbs such as Aspley, Chermside, Kedron, Lutwyche, Wooloowin and Albion to the city centre. The project is a partnership between Council and the State Government.

Currently the stages from Albion are complete, and construction is underway to extend this to Wooloowin.

Council has consulted on a 1.2 kilometre connection from the intersection of Chalk Street and Bridge Street in Wooloowin to the Kedron Brook Bikeway adjacent to Bradshaw Street in Lutwyche.

The existing separated bikeway runs south from Windsor Park towards Victoria Park, and is a direct connection to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Brisbane Showgrounds. From here, the bikeway is shining brighter than ever, following the completion of the Normanby Fiveways Bikeway lighting project. The bikeway continues through Roma Street Parklands and into the city centre.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner South to City Centre

People on bikes travelling from the south can use the Veloway 1 that runs alongside the Pacific Motorway. This connects directly to the Kangaroo Point Bikeway and the city centre.

Use the bikeway to access the city centre from Tarragindi, Holland Park, Greenslopes, Buranda and Woolloongabba. An improved link is being constructed between Holland Park and Tarragindi that will provide a safer bikeway connection to the suburbs beyond.

Destinations on the Veloway 1 include the PA Hospital, Griffith University and stations along the South East Busway.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner East to City Centre

You can ride to the city from the east on both sides of Brisbane River.

From the northern side, use the recently completed 1.2 kilometre Lores Bonney Riverwalk from Bretts Wharf Ferry Terminal to Cameron Rocks Reserve at Breakfast Creek. Continue along the river through Newstead, Teneriffe and New Farm Park. Use a short section of road to connect with the New Farm Riverwalk to Howard Smith Wharves and beyond to Eagle Street and the City Botanic Gardens.

On the south side of the river, use the off-road shared path on the river side of Wynuum Road. A new bike path is being constructed at East Brisbane as part of the Wynnum Road corridor upgrade. A mix of quiet roads and shared pathways takes you under the Story Bridge through Captain Burke Park, and connects to the new Kangaroo Point Bikeway and over the Goodwill Bridge to the city.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner West to City Centre

From Kenmore, Indooroopilly and Fig Tree Pocket, use the Centenary Bikeway that runs adjacent to the Centenary Freeway to Toowong. You can also link to the Mt Coot-tha Botanical Gardens via a dedicated active travel bridge.

Ride through Toowong along Sylvan Road, which now utilises peak period bike lanes. Between 6-9am for inbound traffic and 4-7pm for outbound traffic, from Monday to Friday, parking spaces along Sylvan Road are a no standing zone, meaning bike riders have more on-road space.

Connect with the Bicentennial Bikeway to complete your journey to the city along the Brisbane River. The Bicentennial Bikeway features separated pedestrian and bikeway pathways along its entire 2.7 kilometre length.

cycling brisbane

Mitchelton to Toombul (Kedron Brook Bikeway)

The Kedron Brook Bikeway stretches for almost 20 kilometres from Mitchelton to Nundah using a mixture of off-road shared pathways and separated bikeways. It runs through Everton Park, Stafford, Grange, Gordon Park, Lutwyche and Kedron.

Use the bikeway to get to local schools, shops, sports clubs and busway stations. You can also access many creekside parks, picnic facilities, barbecues and a number of dog off-leash areas.

.Bike Paths Brisbane

Toombul to Sandgate

These bikeways connect north Brisbane suburbs to the Sandgate Foreshore and Shorncliffe Pier. The Jim Soorley Bikeway has links with Toombul Station and shops, and the Nundah Criterium Track. From here it continues along the Kedron Brook towards Nudgee Beach and the Boondall Wetlands.

Connect with the completed Gateway Upgrade North separated bikeway towards Bracken Ride, Deagon and Sandgate, with links to North Boondall Station and a range of leisure and recreation facilities including Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre and Bracken Ridge BMX Facility.

Quiet street links take you to the water with the Sandgate Foreshore to the north (and onward connections to Clontarf) and Shorncliffe Pier to the south.

cycling brisbane

McDowall to Virginia (Downfall Creek Bikeway)

The Downfall Creek Bikeway connects suburbs such as McDowall, Craigslea, Chermside, Geebung and Virgina with important facilities including Westfield Chermside, Chermside Library, Chermside Pool, Seventh Brigade and Marchant Parks, and Virginia Train Station.

7th Brigade Park features a 500-metre street skills course and is a great location for children to develop their bike riding skills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

McDowall to Bracken Ridge (Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway)

The path runs through McDowall, Aspley, Carseldine, Fitzgibbon and Bracken Ride. It connects to a number of local parks, Aspley Shopping Centre, Carseldine Train Station, the Emily Seebohm Aquatic Centre and the brand new Bracken Ridge BMX Facility. The new state-of-the-art facility is the largest of its kind in Australia, with 640 metres of asphalt track suitable for beginner through to more advanced riders.

cycling brisbane

Ashgrove to Herston (Ithaca Creek and Enoggera Creek Bikeways)

These bikeways link the north west suburbs of Ashgrove, Red Hill and Newmarket with the North Brisbane Bikeway to create a connection to the city centre and northern suburbs.

These bikeways provide access to a host of inner-north green spaces and sports clubs including Spencer Park, Finsbury Park and Downey Park.

cycling brisbane

Woolloongabba to the University of Queensland (UQ)

Travelling to the University of Queensland has never been easier thanks to the recently completed Woolloongabba Bikeway. The Woolloongabba Bikeway extends:

  • 1.1 kilometres along Stanley Street between Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba and Dock Street, South Brisbane (separated bikeway), and
  • 1.4 kilometres along Annerley Road between Stanley Street, Woolloongabba and Gladstone Road, Dutton Park (a mix of separated bikeway and on-road bike lanes).

The Stanley Street section provides convenient access to the Gabba Stadium, Mater Hospital, Queensland Children’s Hospital, South Bank and the city centre. Heading up Annerley Road provides access to Boggo Road Urban Village and the forthcoming Inner City South State Secondary College. The bikeway connects you straight to the Eleanor Schonell Bridge and through to UQ and beyond to St Lucia.

The Eleanor Schonell Bridge is the first bridge in Australia exclusively designed for buses, bikes and walking. People riding bikes have access to a separated bikeway, which provides safe and convenient access to the university for students and staff.

No bike? There are CityCycle stations located at both ends of the bridge and at docking stations along Annerley Road and Stanley Street.

You can read more about the Woolloongabba Bikeway upgrade project on Council’s website.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Tarragindi to Norman Park (Norman Creek Bikeway)

The Norman Creek Bikeway stretches from Tarragindi to the Brisbane River at Norman Park, and provides convenient access to many local facilities including busway stations, train stations, Stones Corner Library and shops, Langlands Pool, schools, sports clubs and the Norman Park Ferry.

The bikeway also connects with paths to University of Queensland, PA Hospital and the city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

Wynnum Manly Foreshore

This seafront bikeway provides access to Manly boat harbour and marina, Manly Pool, Manly Village, parks including Wynnum Wading Pool and playground (with Brisbane’s only tidal wading pool), and Wynnum Pier.

Connect with train stations on the Cleveland Line to create an enjoyable day out on the Wynnum Manly Foreshore.

brisbane city bike paths

Murarrie to Wishart (Bulimba Creek Bikeway)

The Bulimba Creek Bikeway stretches from Murrarie to Wishart. Use the bikeway to travel to Westfield Carindale, Carindale Library, Minnippi Parklands, Carindale Recreation Reserve and a number of other parks and open spaces.

Minnippi Parklands includes a 1.6km circular bike route around a lagoon. The smooth, flat pathway makes this a great location to learn to ride.

The northern end of the bikeway finishes at Murrarie Recreation Reserve, which includes a criterium racing track. The reserve is also very close to Murrarie Station.

brisbane city bike paths

Runcorn to Mount Gravatt

This route between Runcorn and Mount Gravatt provides convenient access to many local facilities including busways, train stations, Runcorn Pool, parks, Garden City Library and Westfield Garden City.

It also connects with the Veloway 1 bikeway, which goes from Eight Mile Plains in the south to Brisbane’s city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

QUT Kelvin Grove to QUT Gardens Point

Travelling by bike between QUT Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point is a great option. This route also provides convenient access to Roma Street Parkland, the city centre and South Bank. You can also ride across two green bridges, the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge, where no vehicle access is permitted.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Murarrie to Hamilton

The Murarrie to Hamilton bike ride connects you from the Murarrie train station to the Bretts Wharf ferry terminal via the Sir Leo Hielscher Bridge on the Gateway Motorway. The bridge is an important river crossing and includes an off-road shared path. To the north, the route connects with Kingsford Smith Drive and the Lores Bonney Riverwalk, and links you to inner eastern suburbs to Brisbane’s city centre. To the south, the route provides access to Carindale, Wishart and Eight Mile Plains via the link with Bulimba Creek Bikeway.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Darra to Fig Tree Pocket

These two routes provide convenient access to facilities such as the Darra train station, Mount Ommaney Shopping Centre and Mount Ommaney Library. Choose whether you take the most direct route, or ride via Rocks Riverside Park.

Use these off-road routes to try and replace short car journeys with your bike. For trips to the city, both routes connect to the bikeway that runs alongside the Centenary Freeway towards Toowong and beyond to the city centre.

Bike Paths Brisbane

Eight Mile Plains to Tarragindi

This route runs from the Eight Mile Plains bus station to Tarragindi, with an ongoing direct connection to the city centre. It includes links to Westfield Garden City, Garden City Bus Station and Library, sports facilities and Griffith University Mt Gravatt and Nathan campuses.

At Eight Mile Plains, the route connects to Wishart, Carindale and beyond via Bulimba Creek Bikeway. At Tarragindi, there is a link to the Norman Creek Bikeway, which provides access to busway stations, Stones Corner Library, Langlands Pool and other leisure facilities, schools and the Norman Creek ferry terminal.

Bike Paths

West End to City Centre

This riverside route starts at Orleigh Park and travels along the separated bike path through Riverside Parklands to Davies Park, where you can check out the Davies Park Markets on a Saturday. Ride on-road before joining the off-road bike path that links to the Kurilpa Bridge (walking, bikes and rideables only) into the city centre.

For journeys to the east and south, continue along the river towards South Bank rather than using the bridge. This route also provides easy access to the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Queensland Cultural Centre, South Brisbane train station and the Cultural Centre bus station.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner City Connections

Brisbane isn’t called the river city for nothing. Use this map to find out how to get from the northside of the river to the south, and how to head east and west using two green bridges (the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge) where no vehicle access is permitted, and the separated path on the Go Between Bridge.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

 

 

Brisbane

Aria Property launch South Brisbane apartments Trellis, their most sustainable development to date

Unabashedly green, as homage to it’s name,Aria Property have implemented environmentally forward practices across all aspects of the development

Aria Property Group continue to improve sustainability across their South East Queensland residential apartment developments.

Their newest tower, Trellis, in South Brisbane, is their most sustainable to date.

Unabashedly green, as an homage to it’s name, Aria have implemented environmentally forward practices across all aspects of the development, from the site itself, of which 60 percent is covered in greenery of some variety, as well as the trellises within which improve biodiversity, to solar technology and Tesla batteries.

Aria Property

Trellis 20 Edmondstone Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101

All 110 two and three-bedroom apartments in the 12-storey building feature cross flow ventilated corridors, operable architectural screen doors, double-glazed glass and more. Residents will experience significantly cooler apartments compared to competitor projects, reducing reliance on air-conditioning and facilitating cost savings

With the growing scale of landscaping and greenery on Trellis, Aria is incorporating 60,000L of rainwater tanks to capture as much rainwater as possible to irrigate planting. This will assist in reducing Body Corporate water costs and recycle rainwater typically wasted in most buildings.

This is in line with Aria’s proven track record in more than just sustainability, recognised as the Best High Density Developer in Australia from 2017 – 2019 with Oxley + Stirling Residences, The Melbourne Residences and Botanica Residences.

ARIA say Trellis is one of their most liveable apartments to date. Designed by Rothelowman, they feature three metre high ceilings, Miele appliances, operable glazing and high-end contemporary finishes.

Reminiscent of an urban retreat, Trellis reflects a new style of resort living with 1,119 sqm of recreational amenity across the Temple of Wellness on the ground floor and the Residents’ Rooftop Club on level 13. That features magnesium baths and an infinity pool with views across Brisbane.

The development also offer a podcast/boardroom, serving as a multi-use space for working at home. There’s also a Residents’ Wine Cellar.

Apartments in Trellis start from $739,000 for an apartment with two bedrooms and two bathrooms. Three-bedroom apartments are priced from $1,084,000 to $1,224,000.

Completion is slated for mid-2023

 

Article Source: www.urban.com.au

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Brisbane

Centuria Swoops on Charter Hall’s Adelaide Office Block

Centuria

Fund manager Centuria Capital has swooped on a recently completed office tower in north-west Adelaide for nearly $63 million, struck on a yield of 4.6 per cent.

The 6500sq m commercial building at 21-25 Nile Street in Port Adelaide was completed in 2018 and is fully leased under a 15-year agreement to the South Australia government’s department of transport and infrastructure.

The building was sold by Charter Hall through a direct managed fund after it acquired the asset as a fund-through development in 2017, with a total completion value of $43.6 million.

Charter Hall’s direct business currently manages $7.5 billion in assets and cash inflow from retail investors has accelerated during the past two years to now enable the funds to be running between $90 million to $100 million a month.

Charter Hall Direct chief executive Steven Bennett said the divestment would provide an opportunity for the fund to realise returns for investors and re-deploy capital into new acquisitions and fund existing developments, such as 60 King William Street, in the Adelaide CBD.

“We have continued to curate the portfolio via selective divestments and importantly upgrade the portfolio through investments in core CBD and emerging precincts,” Bennett said.

For Centuria the asset will now provide a compelling investment proposition, with strong tenant covenants and resilient revenue streams.

As well, the suburb of Port Adelaide is a gateway for the federal government-backed Osborne naval shipyard, which will deliver $90 billion of naval defence infrastructure with a 50-year pipeline.

Centuria joint chief executive Jason Huljich said the group had been drawn to the “young property” within Adelaide’s commercial real estate market, which is currently underpinned by strong employment, regeneration and infrastructure projects.

“The A-grade office building is situated in the heart of the state-backed Port Adelaide Rejuvenation Project, a 20-year regeneration initiative that is anticipated to attract up to 8000 additional residents and 1500 construction jobs,” Huljich said.

“[We] remain confident in Australia’s metropolitan and near city office markets, especially those that benefit from long-term government-backed infrastructure projects.”

The property will be held within Centuria’s unlisted real estate fund, Centuria Government Income Property Fund No. 2.

Centuria has been in a strong growth phase, expanding its funds management platform through corporate deals such as its takeover of Primewest.

It has also been active with direct deals, including its recent $224 million acquisition of a Footscray office tower from the Grollo family.

In August, Centuria picked up another recently 18,000sq m completed office tower, this time in South Melbourne, from the ell-known property clan the Deague family for $200 million.

 

Article Source: www.theurbandeveloper.com

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Brisbane

Is this Brisbane’s best art deco home? Historic house draws buyers nationwide

Brisbane’s best art deco home

Money can’t buy you love, but it can buy you Brisbane’s best art deco home with a back story so romantic it’s making buyers swoon.

Once the residence of award-winning Australian author David Malouf, the three-level abode at 19 Arran Avenue, Hamilton, hit the market just days ago for the first time in 15 years – and it’s offering more than just double brick and mortar, but the memories of a celebrated writer who penned his best works from within its walls.

Mr Malouf, whose father commissioned the exquisite three-level property back in 1947, wrote the semi-autobiographical novel Johnno before writing the prize-winning epic The Great World in 1990. He penned several other novels at his beloved Hamilton home before engraving his signature into one of the cabinets.

Brisbane’s best art deco home

19 Arran Avenue, Hamilton. Photo: Place Estate Agents Ascot 

It’s a tantalising tale that has mesmerised dozens of home-hunters from across the country ahead of the September 8 auction, selling agent and Place Estate Agents Ascot director Drew Davies said, with the rooftop terrace, bespoke features and an exquisite renovation further igniting appetite for the house that’s being dubbed an architectural marvel.

“It’s hard not to get wrapped up in the romance of that story,” Mr Davies said.

“But buyers also love the fact that it retains all the characteristics of a true art deco home … and it’s had more interest from Melbourne and Sydney people than any other home I’ve listed.”

With art deco brick homes as rare as hens’ teeth in Brisbane, Mr Davies said, savvy home hunters could fully appreciate the incredible opportunity – an opportunity he said was enhanced by the home’s high-end renovation that in today’s market was worth a small fortune.

“Any time you’re dealing with a renovation for a brick house, the price can skyrocket. This renovation by architect Philip Horwood has been done to the highest level – from the bespoke kitchen, the feature skylights in … and the rooftop terrace that has glass panelling – it’s just stunning, and it’s hard for me not to fall in love with it,” Mr Davies said.

“You would need to be having very serious chats with the bank to build something like that today.”

The art deco dream abode is bound to fetch a pretty penny at auction amid a property boom that’s catapulting prices in high-end homes across the city, ensuring a tidy profit for the current owner who snapped it up for just $950,000 back in July 2006.

And considering the home’s list of features, there’s no doubt the next custodian will feel it was money well spent.

Perched on a hill, the secluded property boasts gun barrel views of the Brisbane River – best seen from that full-floor rooftop terrace that’s accessed via a spiral staircase.

Brisbane’s best art deco home

The Darren James kitchen. Photo: Place Estate Agents Ascot 

Then there are the leadlight windows, double terrace doors and a stunning kitchen styled by Darren James that features rosewood cabinetry and Brazilian granite benchtops.

Defying the struggles of many a light-challenged brick abode, Mr Davies said the home was luminescent thanks to the eight skylights, with additional features including an opulent main suite with a dual shower, inset spa and a bidet.

“[At 637 square metres] it’s a big chunk of land, too, and it’s an extremely private location as well … that’s been a big drawcard,” Mr Davies said.

With buyer interest from couples and downsizers growing by the day, he said it was tough to say just how many bidders would throw up their hands next Wednesday, however with soaring interstate interest, there was a good chance the home’s next owner could hail from one of the nation’s two biggest cities.

“I continue to see a massive shift towards interstate buyers. Since Friday last week, I have transacted three sight unseen sales to interstate buyers alone,” Mr Davies said.

“The market couldn’t be hotter.”

The auction of 19 Arran Avenue will be held at a special Place Estate Agents in-room event at the Revival Art and Design Gallery at 3/17 Greg Chappell Street, Albion, at 6pm.

 

Article Source: www.domain.com.au

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