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Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

 

Brisbane has an extensive and growing network of bikeways.

Through the Better Bikeways 4 Brisbane program, Brisbane City Council is investing $100 million between July 2016 and 2020 on bikeways to improve access to local destinations and the city centre. The Lord Mayor’s signature bikeway projects include:

Training rides

Brisbane has many popular training rides. Here are two of the best loops to try.

Mt Coot-tha loop

The ride begins at the base of Mt Coot-tha on Sir Samuel Griffith Drive. Ride in a clockwise direction for a moderate in-the-saddle climb, or in an anti-clockwise direction for a challenging, leg-burning ascent. The loop is approximately 12 kilometres. Ramp up your hill training with this heart-pumping ride and be rewarded with amazing views at the summit lookout.

Brisbane River loop

This 35-40 kilometre ride includes bikeways and on-road riding in South Brisbane, Brisbane City, Milton, Auchenflower, Toowong, St Lucia, Indooroopilly, Chelmer, Graceville, Tennyson, Yeronga, Dutton Park, Highgate Hill and West End. There are lots of variations to the loop and it can be completed in either direction (generally anti-clockwise for training), with many people beginning and ending the ride at South Bank.

For more information on training rides and other bikeways, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au

Brisbane Cycling Festival

The annual Brisbane Cycling Festival brings the best of the world’s track cyclists to the Anna Meares Velodrome at Chandler. It also includes competitive road races and mass participation events.

 

Brisbane’s bikeways

Brisbane’s bikeways are a great way of getting to and from where you are going without the hassles of finding a car park and being stuck in traffic.

Ride around the city

Council is building a bikeway network for the whole city. To keep up with new bikeways and consultations, sign up to Cycling Brisbane (see page 2).

For suggestions about where to ride, visit cyclingbrisbane.com.au/bikeways/brisbane-bikeway-rides

Beat the heat

Brisbane summers are hot, so it’s good to know that leafy parts of the city can be more than five degrees cooler than treeless areas, which make them more pleasant places to ride. Bikeways are often located through parks and alongside waterways.

You will find stretches of leafy shade along:

  • Bulimba Creek Bikeway (map 13)
  • Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway (map 8)
  • Enoggera Creek Bikeway (map 9)

Alternatively, you may want to consider an electric bike (e-bike) to help keep you riding all year round. E-bikes give a power boost provided you are pedalling. They may help you to keep riding through heat and humidity, and over hills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Inner North to City Centre

The North Brisbane Bikeway is being constructed in stages to connect northern suburbs such as Aspley, Chermside, Kedron, Lutwyche, Wooloowin and Albion to the city centre. The project is a partnership between Council and the State Government.

Currently the stages from Albion are complete, and construction is underway to extend this to Wooloowin.

Council has consulted on a 1.2 kilometre connection from the intersection of Chalk Street and Bridge Street in Wooloowin to the Kedron Brook Bikeway adjacent to Bradshaw Street in Lutwyche.

The existing separated bikeway runs south from Windsor Park towards Victoria Park, and is a direct connection to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Brisbane Showgrounds. From here, the bikeway is shining brighter than ever, following the completion of the Normanby Fiveways Bikeway lighting project. The bikeway continues through Roma Street Parklands and into the city centre.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner South to City Centre

People on bikes travelling from the south can use the Veloway 1 that runs alongside the Pacific Motorway. This connects directly to the Kangaroo Point Bikeway and the city centre.

Use the bikeway to access the city centre from Tarragindi, Holland Park, Greenslopes, Buranda and Woolloongabba. An improved link is being constructed between Holland Park and Tarragindi that will provide a safer bikeway connection to the suburbs beyond.

Destinations on the Veloway 1 include the PA Hospital, Griffith University and stations along the South East Busway.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner East to City Centre

You can ride to the city from the east on both sides of Brisbane River.

From the northern side, use the recently completed 1.2 kilometre Lores Bonney Riverwalk from Bretts Wharf Ferry Terminal to Cameron Rocks Reserve at Breakfast Creek. Continue along the river through Newstead, Teneriffe and New Farm Park. Use a short section of road to connect with the New Farm Riverwalk to Howard Smith Wharves and beyond to Eagle Street and the City Botanic Gardens.

On the south side of the river, use the off-road shared path on the river side of Wynuum Road. A new bike path is being constructed at East Brisbane as part of the Wynnum Road corridor upgrade. A mix of quiet roads and shared pathways takes you under the Story Bridge through Captain Burke Park, and connects to the new Kangaroo Point Bikeway and over the Goodwill Bridge to the city.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Inner West to City Centre

From Kenmore, Indooroopilly and Fig Tree Pocket, use the Centenary Bikeway that runs adjacent to the Centenary Freeway to Toowong. You can also link to the Mt Coot-tha Botanical Gardens via a dedicated active travel bridge.

Ride through Toowong along Sylvan Road, which now utilises peak period bike lanes. Between 6-9am for inbound traffic and 4-7pm for outbound traffic, from Monday to Friday, parking spaces along Sylvan Road are a no standing zone, meaning bike riders have more on-road space.

Connect with the Bicentennial Bikeway to complete your journey to the city along the Brisbane River. The Bicentennial Bikeway features separated pedestrian and bikeway pathways along its entire 2.7 kilometre length.

cycling brisbane

Mitchelton to Toombul (Kedron Brook Bikeway)

The Kedron Brook Bikeway stretches for almost 20 kilometres from Mitchelton to Nundah using a mixture of off-road shared pathways and separated bikeways. It runs through Everton Park, Stafford, Grange, Gordon Park, Lutwyche and Kedron.

Use the bikeway to get to local schools, shops, sports clubs and busway stations. You can also access many creekside parks, picnic facilities, barbecues and a number of dog off-leash areas.

.Bike Paths Brisbane

Toombul to Sandgate

These bikeways connect north Brisbane suburbs to the Sandgate Foreshore and Shorncliffe Pier. The Jim Soorley Bikeway has links with Toombul Station and shops, and the Nundah Criterium Track. From here it continues along the Kedron Brook towards Nudgee Beach and the Boondall Wetlands.

Connect with the completed Gateway Upgrade North separated bikeway towards Bracken Ride, Deagon and Sandgate, with links to North Boondall Station and a range of leisure and recreation facilities including Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre and Bracken Ridge BMX Facility.

Quiet street links take you to the water with the Sandgate Foreshore to the north (and onward connections to Clontarf) and Shorncliffe Pier to the south.

cycling brisbane

McDowall to Virginia (Downfall Creek Bikeway)

The Downfall Creek Bikeway connects suburbs such as McDowall, Craigslea, Chermside, Geebung and Virgina with important facilities including Westfield Chermside, Chermside Library, Chermside Pool, Seventh Brigade and Marchant Parks, and Virginia Train Station.

7th Brigade Park features a 500-metre street skills course and is a great location for children to develop their bike riding skills.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

McDowall to Bracken Ridge (Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway)

The path runs through McDowall, Aspley, Carseldine, Fitzgibbon and Bracken Ride. It connects to a number of local parks, Aspley Shopping Centre, Carseldine Train Station, the Emily Seebohm Aquatic Centre and the brand new Bracken Ridge BMX Facility. The new state-of-the-art facility is the largest of its kind in Australia, with 640 metres of asphalt track suitable for beginner through to more advanced riders.

cycling brisbane

Ashgrove to Herston (Ithaca Creek and Enoggera Creek Bikeways)

These bikeways link the north west suburbs of Ashgrove, Red Hill and Newmarket with the North Brisbane Bikeway to create a connection to the city centre and northern suburbs.

These bikeways provide access to a host of inner-north green spaces and sports clubs including Spencer Park, Finsbury Park and Downey Park.

cycling brisbane

Woolloongabba to the University of Queensland (UQ)

Travelling to the University of Queensland has never been easier thanks to the recently completed Woolloongabba Bikeway. The Woolloongabba Bikeway extends:

  • 1.1 kilometres along Stanley Street between Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba and Dock Street, South Brisbane (separated bikeway), and
  • 1.4 kilometres along Annerley Road between Stanley Street, Woolloongabba and Gladstone Road, Dutton Park (a mix of separated bikeway and on-road bike lanes).

The Stanley Street section provides convenient access to the Gabba Stadium, Mater Hospital, Queensland Children’s Hospital, South Bank and the city centre. Heading up Annerley Road provides access to Boggo Road Urban Village and the forthcoming Inner City South State Secondary College. The bikeway connects you straight to the Eleanor Schonell Bridge and through to UQ and beyond to St Lucia.

The Eleanor Schonell Bridge is the first bridge in Australia exclusively designed for buses, bikes and walking. People riding bikes have access to a separated bikeway, which provides safe and convenient access to the university for students and staff.

No bike? There are CityCycle stations located at both ends of the bridge and at docking stations along Annerley Road and Stanley Street.

You can read more about the Woolloongabba Bikeway upgrade project on Council’s website.

Brisbane Bike Path maps

Tarragindi to Norman Park (Norman Creek Bikeway)

The Norman Creek Bikeway stretches from Tarragindi to the Brisbane River at Norman Park, and provides convenient access to many local facilities including busway stations, train stations, Stones Corner Library and shops, Langlands Pool, schools, sports clubs and the Norman Park Ferry.

The bikeway also connects with paths to University of Queensland, PA Hospital and the city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

Wynnum Manly Foreshore

This seafront bikeway provides access to Manly boat harbour and marina, Manly Pool, Manly Village, parks including Wynnum Wading Pool and playground (with Brisbane’s only tidal wading pool), and Wynnum Pier.

Connect with train stations on the Cleveland Line to create an enjoyable day out on the Wynnum Manly Foreshore.

brisbane city bike paths

Murarrie to Wishart (Bulimba Creek Bikeway)

The Bulimba Creek Bikeway stretches from Murrarie to Wishart. Use the bikeway to travel to Westfield Carindale, Carindale Library, Minnippi Parklands, Carindale Recreation Reserve and a number of other parks and open spaces.

Minnippi Parklands includes a 1.6km circular bike route around a lagoon. The smooth, flat pathway makes this a great location to learn to ride.

The northern end of the bikeway finishes at Murrarie Recreation Reserve, which includes a criterium racing track. The reserve is also very close to Murrarie Station.

brisbane city bike paths

Runcorn to Mount Gravatt

This route between Runcorn and Mount Gravatt provides convenient access to many local facilities including busways, train stations, Runcorn Pool, parks, Garden City Library and Westfield Garden City.

It also connects with the Veloway 1 bikeway, which goes from Eight Mile Plains in the south to Brisbane’s city centre.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

QUT Kelvin Grove to QUT Gardens Point

Travelling by bike between QUT Kelvin Grove and Gardens Point is a great option. This route also provides convenient access to Roma Street Parkland, the city centre and South Bank. You can also ride across two green bridges, the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge, where no vehicle access is permitted.

Cycling on Brisbane Bike Paths

Murarrie to Hamilton

The Murarrie to Hamilton bike ride connects you from the Murarrie train station to the Bretts Wharf ferry terminal via the Sir Leo Hielscher Bridge on the Gateway Motorway. The bridge is an important river crossing and includes an off-road shared path. To the north, the route connects with Kingsford Smith Drive and the Lores Bonney Riverwalk, and links you to inner eastern suburbs to Brisbane’s city centre. To the south, the route provides access to Carindale, Wishart and Eight Mile Plains via the link with Bulimba Creek Bikeway.

Brisbane Bike Paths

Darra to Fig Tree Pocket

These two routes provide convenient access to facilities such as the Darra train station, Mount Ommaney Shopping Centre and Mount Ommaney Library. Choose whether you take the most direct route, or ride via Rocks Riverside Park.

Use these off-road routes to try and replace short car journeys with your bike. For trips to the city, both routes connect to the bikeway that runs alongside the Centenary Freeway towards Toowong and beyond to the city centre.

Bike Paths Brisbane

Eight Mile Plains to Tarragindi

This route runs from the Eight Mile Plains bus station to Tarragindi, with an ongoing direct connection to the city centre. It includes links to Westfield Garden City, Garden City Bus Station and Library, sports facilities and Griffith University Mt Gravatt and Nathan campuses.

At Eight Mile Plains, the route connects to Wishart, Carindale and beyond via Bulimba Creek Bikeway. At Tarragindi, there is a link to the Norman Creek Bikeway, which provides access to busway stations, Stones Corner Library, Langlands Pool and other leisure facilities, schools and the Norman Creek ferry terminal.

Bike Paths

West End to City Centre

This riverside route starts at Orleigh Park and travels along the separated bike path through Riverside Parklands to Davies Park, where you can check out the Davies Park Markets on a Saturday. Ride on-road before joining the off-road bike path that links to the Kurilpa Bridge (walking, bikes and rideables only) into the city centre.

For journeys to the east and south, continue along the river towards South Bank rather than using the bridge. This route also provides easy access to the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Queensland Cultural Centre, South Brisbane train station and the Cultural Centre bus station.

Cycling in Brisbane

Inner City Connections

Brisbane isn’t called the river city for nothing. Use this map to find out how to get from the northside of the river to the south, and how to head east and west using two green bridges (the Kurilpa Bridge and Goodwill Bridge) where no vehicle access is permitted, and the separated path on the Go Between Bridge.

Cycling in Brisbane

 

 

 

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Brisbane

Why investors snap up apartments in Aria Property Group’s Brisbane apartment developments

Aria Property Group have pushed the envelope not only on sustainability but value at their newest tower, Trellis in South Brisbane

Aria Property Group always have a steady stream of interest from off the plan investors in their Brisbane apartment developments.

Investors who bought in to one of Aria’s most recently completed developments, The Standard, Aria, located in the heart of the Fish Lane arts precinct, saw great success.

Those who bought pre-completion have secured resales between 10 per cent and 38 per cent more than what they paid. Owner-occupiers showed the greatest keenness on the resales.

The investors who decided to hold on to their apartments are seeing strong 5.48 per cent rental yields throughout the building.

Aria’s latest development, Trellis, also in South Brisbane, is also expected to be a hit with investors.

The 12-story building with 110 apartments is Aria’s most sustainable yet, with 60 percent of the building covered in greenery of some variety. It will feature trellises within which improve biodiversity, as well as solar technology and even Tesla batteries and charging stations.

Aria Property Group

Trellis 20 Edmondstone Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101 

There’s over 1,000 sqm of recreational amenity space, including the Temple of Wellness on the ground floor and the Residents’ Rooftop Club on level 13. That features magnesium baths and an infinity pool with views across Brisbane. Amenity is also high on the priority list for tenants.

Apartments in Trellis start from $739,000 for a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment. Three-bedroom apartments are priced from $1,084,000 to $1,224,000.

Completion is forecast for mid-2023.

The Brisbane apartment market has continued to show strength over 2021, after a resilient 2020 in the wake of the pandemic.

Research from property data firm CoreLogic showed Brisbane apartment values rose 0.6 per cent over September, triple the growth of apartments in Melbourne.

At the end of 2020, the median apartment value in Brisbane was at a yearly high of $390,000. Now it’s $430,000.

Unit rental prices have also seen steady growth in 2021, up 3.5 per cent over the past 12 months.

This growth trend is expected to continue, backed in large part by billions of dollars in investment from both private and public sectors as part of the pipeline for the 2032 Olympics.

 

Article Source: www.urban.com.au

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Brisbane

High-End Apartment Shortfall Pumps Up Prices

Upward pressure on the top end of the market looks likely to continue with a 39 per cent fall in the number of new luxury apartment projects predicted over the next three years.

The Rightsizing Report by Knight Frank showed pipeline constraints for properties above $2 million to $3 million would be most felt in Brisbane and Sydney.

Perth and the Gold Coast have more new apartments on the way which may go some way to easing the pressure for this stock.

But demand for apartments above $10 million was even more intense—sales have increased eight times the 10-year average during the first six months of 2021 in Australia.

This contrasts with the middle of 2020 when the global super-prime market took a -61 per cent hit.

Contributing to the success of the Australian market this year were Crown Resorts’ One Barangaroo and Lendlease’s One Sydney Harbour.

apartment

▲ Full-floor apartments in Luxe Broadbeach on the Gold Coast are expected to fetch more than $4.95 million.

Knight Frank head of residential research Michelle Ciesielski said although people were prepared to spend what it took to meet their requirements, it was difficult to find stock.

“The widening gap between this buyer demand and appropriate property supply remains concerning, and residential construction difficulties continue to delay delivery of new product,” Ciesielski said.

“The shortage of suitable product, particularly at the top end of the market where rightsizers play, has been exacerbated by developers unable to easily secure sites in prime locations, adding to the highly pressurised buying environment across Australian cities.”

Buyers in this demographic were increasingly looking for three bedrooms, with developers increasing the share of this configuration from 21 per cent in 2018 to 32 per cent in 2021.

“During the coming years, we will see an increasing number of rightsizers who are seeking a low- maintenance home as their main residence, given the transient global lifestyle that will return for many of the ultra-wealthy population,” Ciesielski said.

“This pent-up demand will continue while new luxury apartment delivery and sales listings remain shallow across almost every prime region of Australia.”

The number of car parking spaces was also contributing to the final sale result with apartments selling for 39 per cent more on average, at $39,800/sq m, with spaces compared to $30,200/sq m without in Sydney, while the difference in Melbourne was 9.2 per cent.

 

Article Source: www.theurbandeveloper.com

 

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Brisbane

Cromwell Spends $185m on Golden Triangle Tower

ISPT has sold its recently renovated tower in Brisbane’s golden triangle for $184.7 million to Cromwell Property Group for its DPF fund.

The 24-storey office tower at 100 Creek Street, Brisbane has a net lettable area of 20,223 square metres.

It is the second purchase for the fund in Brisbane after it secured the former Flight Centre headquarters at 545 Queen Street for $117.5 million in May.

Meanwhile, Cromwell Funds Management Limited sold its nine-storey Icon office tower in Ipswich for $144.9 million a month ago.

The Creek Street building has a mix of tenants, a 6-star NABERS indoor rating, end-of-trip facilities and floor-to-ceiling glass panelling.

The sale follows another golden triangle transaction, in August, when Fortius Funds Management and PGIM bought a similar sized building at 307 Queen Street for $214 million.

The surge of transaction in the area comes as Brisbane occupancy drops to 51 per cent, according to the Property Council of Australia.

Cromwell

▲ The golden triangle is bounded by Edward, Queen and Eagle Streets and is a financial district in the Brisbane CBD.

Cromwell head of retail funds management Hamish Wehl said it was a landmark building and stellar addition to the fund.

“The asset has a sensational location, benefits from great amenity and has been recently substantially refurbished,” Wehl said.

“It’s earnings accretive to DPF and will support the fund’s long-standing track record of paying unitholders a regular reliable income.”

ISPT spent $10 million upgrading the 100 Creek Street building in 2018, giving it new bathrooms, a semi-open foyer as well as creating a French provincial style laneway market.

The direct property fund has an annualised distribution yield of 5.4 per cent with nine office assets in Queensland, NSW, Victoria and the ACT.

The acquisition is subject to Foreign Investment Review Board approval and is expected to settle towards the end of November.

 

Article Source:www.theurbandeveloper.com

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